Floods: 7,924 Households Displaced, NEMA orders Evacuation of Communities

Floods in the last two weeks of August left an estimated 47,544 people (about 7,924
households) displaced across the country according to the National Emergency
Management Agency (NEMA). The most affected states are Kano, Jigawa, Bauchi, Abia,
Zamfara and Kogi. Currently, the states at highest risk of floods are Niger, Kogi, Kwara,
Kebbi, Anambra and Delta.

A flooded residential building in Anambra State, Nigeria. Photo: UN/ Oluseyi Soremekun (2012).

A flooded residential building in Anambra State, Nigeria. Photo: UN/ Oluseyi Soremekun (2012).


According to the ‘Humanitarian Bulletin Nigeria’ Issue 05, September 2013, published by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) Nigeria, a reported 23 deaths have occurred as a result of the rains: seven from Bauchi, five from Edo, four from Ebonyi, four children from Zamfara and one from Kano state; exact figures of the displaced are unknown. NEMA has donated relief materials to populations affected by floods in Kastina, Bauchi, Gombe, Kogi, Zamfara, Jigawa and Kano states.
According to the Bauchi State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA), floods in the
state affected 13 Local Government Areas namely, Dambam, Kirfi, Alkaleri, Zaki, Bogoro, Toro, Jama’re, Shira, Itas/Gadau, Darazo, Ganjuwa, Dass and Bauchi— affecting a total of 123 villages. The floods reportedly killed seven and hospitalized 17; 2,217 farmlands were reportedly submerged and 1,529 homes destroyed. One school is currently being used as a campsite for IDPs.
Abia State has also been badly affected by floods in 11 Local Government Areas composed of 20 villages. A reported 2,969 people have been displaced, an unspecified number of homes destroyed, livelihoods disrupted, and drinking water sources compromised. Landslides have also followed from the heavy rains and overflows of the Avu dam at Akanu Item community and the Ikwu river banks in Umuahia North and Ndu Lake in Obingw. Access to roads affected has been limited as a result of the flood.
Flooded homes in Anambra state, Nigeria. Photo: UN/ Oluseyi Soremekun (2012).

Flooded homes in Anambra state, Nigeria. Photo: UN/ Oluseyi Soremekun (2012).


NEMA has ordered the immediate evacuation of communities along the Niger River after assessments indicated that the Jebba and Kainji hydroelectric power dams have attained their highest water level in the last three decades. According to the NEMA, the threat has created a high risk of flooding downstream. Communities along the river are being relocated to higher grounds. States at risk are Niger, Kogi, Kwara, Kebbi, Anambra and Delta.
Sectoral Needs and Response
Since March 2013, NEMA has collaborated with key stakeholders including the UN, INGOs, Red Cross Movement, donors and SEMA to strengthen flood preparedness mechanisms. NEMA has embarked on a nation-wide campaign to sensitize communities living along the flood plains to relocate to safe places in order to reduce their level of vulnerability and flood risk. NEMA has also reviewed the National Contingency Plan and is engaging in capacity-building activities with relevant stakeholders as part of its preparedness plans.
Communities cut-off as roads and bridges are washed away by flood. Photo: UN/ Oluseyi Soremekun (2012).

Communities cut-off as roads and bridges are washed away by flood. Photo: UN/ Oluseyi Soremekun (2012).

In addition to raising awareness, NEMA has organized training programs to strengthen the capacity of government and humanitarian actors to better prepare and respond to imminent flooding. In August, 38 officials of the SEMA and NEMA Zonal Coordination Office— all from flood-prone states across Nigeria — were trained in Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM). The workshop was organized and co-facilitated by NEMA, UNHCR and IOM with the support of NCFR and Rhema Care. A series of trainings have been conducted to ensure that the CCCM trainings reach the sub-national level.