Author Archives: Oluseyi Soremekun

The Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ Message on The International Day of Zero Tolerance For Female Genital Mutilation (6 February)

Female genital mutilation is a gross violation of the human rights of women and girls.

Over 200 million women and girls alive today have experienced female genital mutilation in 30 countries across three continents.

Without concerted, accelerated action, a further 68 million girls could be subjected to this harmful practice by 2030.

With strong political engagement, we are seeing success in several countries. But this progress is not enough to keep up with population growth. Unless we act now, the number of cases will continue to rise.

Sustainable development cannot be achieved without full respect for the human rights of women and girls. Sustainable Development Goal 5, with a focus on gender equality, calls for the elimination of female genital mutilation by 2030.

Together with the European Union, the United Nations has launched the Spotlight Initiative, a global, multi-year undertaking that aims to create strong partnerships and align efforts to end all forms of violence against women and girls, including female genital mutilation.

With the dignity, health and well-being of millions of girls at stake, there is no time to waste. Together, we can and must end this harmful practice.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ Message On The Olympic Truce For The Pyeongchang Olympic Winter Games And Paralympic Winter Games

In one week’s time, the world will gather in PyeongChang in the Republic of Korea, united by the Olympic Spirit: in solidarity; mutual respect; and friendly competition.

The Olympics and Paralympics showcase the best of the world’s athletic achievements, and the best of humanity.

The Olympic Truce, which dates back to Ancient Greece, allows for the safe travel of athletes and spectators, and demands peace among participants during the period when the games take place.

Its fundamental message is that our common humanity can transcend political differences.

This ideal has more resonance than ever on the Korean peninsula.

I call on all parties to conflict to observe the Olympic Truce during the 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Let the Olympic Flame shine as a beacon to human solidarity.

Let the Olympic Truce help spread a culture of peace.

We all have responsibility to resist racism and violence – UN

As the world marks the 2018 International Day of Commemoration In Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust today, the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, has noted that “All of us have a responsibility to quickly, clearly and decisively resist racism and violence. Through education and understanding, we could build a future of dignity, human rights and peaceful coexistence for all.”

Mr Guterres acknowledged in his message delivered in Lagos by the Director of the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Lagos, Mr Ronald Kayanja, that decades since the Second World War, “we see the persistence of anti-Semitism and an increase in other forms of prejudice.” He therefore charged everyone that “We must stand together against the normalization of hate. Whenever and wherever humanity’s values are abandoned, we are all at risk.”

Explaining why the UN was commemorating the Day, Mr Kayanja said that it was one of the saddest moments in human history and that was why the UN General Assembly decided that every 27 January, the world should remember the saddest event so that it would not happen again. “We are talking to the students because we do not want a future where a human being kills another human being just because they are different from him or her or they are of different tribes or religions.” He added.

Speaking, the Tutor General/ Permanent Secretary of Lagos Education District 1, Dr O. Abiose Ayandele, urged everyone to treat each other as fellow human beings and learn to live in peace and make the world a better place.Th e Tutor General who was represented by the District’s Director of School Administration, Mrs Akor, added that “We are all one created by one and the same God. No one is superior to the other.”

The observance of the 2018 Holocaust Remembrance in Nigeria, organized on Thursday 25 January 2018, by the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Lagos, in collaboration with the Ministry of Education, Lagos Education District 1, turned out to be a great learning experience and lessons in tolerance, seeking peace and shunning prejudice and hatred for 500 secondary school students and 96 teachers from the Education District.

The students, drawn from the 99 secondary Schools in Education District 1, were exposed to a Poster Exhibition titled, “The Butterfly Project: Remembering the Children of the Holocaust”; Film Screening titled, “The Path To Nazi Genocide” and a Quiz Competition on the Holocaust and the United Nations.

It was a brilliant demonstration of knowledge of the Holocaust and the lessons derived therefrom by the students. Explaining his lessons learnt, Daniel Idulagbe (10 years old) of Meiran Community Junior High School Lagos gleefully acknowledged, “I learnt that we should ensure we are not involved in any form of racism, anti-Semitism, prejudice or hatred against anyone.”

According to Akinfewa Boluwatife (12 years old) Alimosho Junior Grammar school), “We should not discriminate against anyone or any religion or belief. There should be no room for intolerance.” Naomi Ifeoluwa Okikiri (14 years old) of Ojokoro Senior High School, Lagos, summarized her lessons learnt: “I learnt that as human beings, we should learn to tolerate our neighbours.”

Curating the Poster Exhibition, the National Information Officer of UNIC Lagos, Dr Oluseyi Soremekun, explained that the Poster Exhibition showed what happened to young people, and what happened to their hopes and dreams, during a very difficult time in world history known as the Holocaust.

According to him, “The Nazis were racist and anti-Semitic. The Nazis were anti-Semitic because they were prejudiced against Jewish people. The Nazis believed that people were born inferior or superior depending on the colour of their skin or their religious beliefs.”  This belief, he pointed out to the students, is racist because no person is born a superior or inferior person.

The Quiz competition started with 200 students from 99 schools out of whom 20 students from ten schools qualified for the finals. At the end of the finals the Winners emerged: First place winners were Chigozie Ndubusi and Mosimiloluwa Adebisi (Shasha Senior Community College); Second place were Barakat Adekanbi and Jessica Opara (Ipaja Junior College); while the Third place winners were Augustine Valentine (Stadium Junior Grammar school).

The theme of the Holocaust memorial ceremony is “Holocaust Remembrance and Education: Our Shared Responsibility”. The theme highlights the universal dimension of the Holocaust and encourages education on this tragedy so that future generations will firmly reject all forms of racism, violence and anti-Semitism. The Holocaust was a defining point in history and its lessons have much to teach about the danger of extremism and the prevention of genocide today.

Rejecting any denial of the Holocaust as a historical event, either in full or in part, the General Assembly adopted a resolution (A/RES/60/7) by consensus condemning “without reserve” all manifestations of religious intolerance, incitement, harassment or violence against persons or communities based on ethnic origin or religious belief, whenever they occur.

UN Commits to ‘Leave no One Behind’, Unveils SDGs in Braille

In continuation of its commitment to leaving no one behind in the promotion of Agenda 2030 for sustainable development, the United Nations has unveiled the Braille Version of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Initiated and produced by the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Nigeria, the SDGs in Braille was unveiled on Thursday, 11 January 2018 at the closing ceremony of the One-Week Braille Celebration in Abeokuta, Ogun State.

Presenting the SDGs Braille to the Ogun State Commissioner for Education, Science and Technology, Mrs Modupe Mujota, the UNIC National Information Officer, Dr Oluseyi Soremekun, noted that in deepening inclusive access to information, UNIC took steps to ensuring that no one is left behind in understanding the global development framework, ‘Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to which both the Federal and State Governments have aligned their development priorities.

The National Information Officer, who represented the Director of UNIC Nigeria, Mr Ronald Kayanja,  enjoined the Honourable  Commissioner for Education, Science and Technology, to share the SDGs Braille in all the Schools for the Blind in the State. The SDGs Braille, according to him, was aimed at fostering access to information by all and enhancing a sense of inclusiveness amongst the blind.

“The blind are human beings and their rights to education and other rights as enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) must not be denied them. In line with the Salamanca Statement and Framework For Action On Special Needs Education, I call on governments to give the highest policy and budgetary priority to Special Needs Education.” He added. Dr Soremekun later presented to Mrs Mujota, copies of the Braille Version of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) which was the world’s first complete UDHR in braille, initiated and produced by UNIC Lagos Nigeria.

Speaking, the Honourable Commissioner for Education, Science and Technology, acknowledged that the World Braille Day provided the opportunity to raise awareness about issues mitigating against the education and communication needs of blind persons. “The challenges blind people face in normalisation and inclusion into the mainstream of our society are many. The dearth of reading materials, specialised aids, games and equipment to mention but just a few.” She explained.

Mrs Mujota therefore, called on individuals, corporate bodies and other stakeholders to complement the State Government’s efforts by contributing to the growth of Special Needs Education Institutions.

Welcoming the audience to the occasion, the Director of Special Needs Education, Ogun State Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Mr Elijah Akinyemi, commended the Ogun State House of Assembly for the passage of the Ogun Disability Bill on 16 November 2017 and called on Governor Ibikunle Amosun to assent to the bill to realise an inclusive society which provides every citizen of Ogun State the attainment of their inalienable rights.

The high point of the Braille Celebration was the brilliant reading of the SDGs Braille by Ms Ronke Gisanri of the State Ministry of Information, Abeokuta.

 

Towards a new global compact on migration – By António Guterres

Managing migration is one of the most profound challenges for international cooperation in our time. 

Migration powers economic growth, reduces inequalities and connects diverse societies.  Yet it is also a source of political tensions and human tragedies.  The majority of migrants live and work legally.  But a desperate minority are putting their lives at risk to enter countries where they face suspicion and abuse.

Demographic pressures and the impact of climate change on vulnerable societies are likely to drive further migration in the years ahead.  As a global community, we face a choice.  Do we want migration to be a source of prosperity and international solidarity, or a byword for inhumanity and social friction? 

This year, governments will negotiate a Global Compact on Migration through the United Nations.

 This will be the first overarching international agreement of its kind.  It will not be a formal treaty. Nor will it place any binding obligations on states.   

Instead, it is an unprecedented opportunity for leaders to counter the pernicious myths surrounding migrants, and lay out a common vision of how to make migration work for all our nations.  

This is an urgent task.  We have seen what happens when large-scale migration takes place without effective mechanisms to manage it.  The world was shocked by recent video of migrants being sold as slaves. 

Grim as these images were, the real scandal is that thousands of migrants suffer the same fate each year, unrecorded.  Many more are trapped in demeaning, precarious jobs that border on slavery anyway.

 There are nearly six million migrants trapped in forced labor today, often in developed economies.

 How can we end these injustices and prevent them recurring in future? 

 In setting a clear political direction about the future of migration, I believe that three fundamental considerations should guide discussions of the compact.

 The first is to recognize and reinforce the benefits of migration, so often lost in public debate.

 Migrants make huge contributions to both their host countries and countries of origin. 

 They take jobs that local workforces cannot fill, boosting economic activity.  Many are innovators and entrepreneurs.  Nearly half of all migrants are women, looking for better lives and work opportunities.

Migrants also make a major contribution to international development by sending remittances to their home countries.  Remittances added up to nearly $600 billion last year, three times all development aid.

 The fundamental challenge is to maximize the benefits of this orderly, productive form of migration while stamping out the abuses and prejudice that make life hell for a minority of migrants. 

Secondly, states need to strengthen the rule of law underpinning how they manage and protect migrants – for the benefit of their economies, their societies and the migrants themselves.

 Authorities that erect major obstacles to migration – or place severe restrictions on migrants’ work opportunities – inflict needless economic self-harm, as they impose barriers to having their labour needs met in an orderly, legal fashion.

 Worse still, they unintentionally encourage illegal migration.

 Aspiring migrants, denied legal pathways to travel, inevitably fall back on irregular methods. 

This not only puts them in vulnerable positions, but also undermines governments’ authority.

 The best way to end the stigma of illegality and abuse around migrants is, in fact, for governments to put in place more legal pathways for migration, removing the incentives for individuals to break the rules, while better meeting the needs of their labor markets for foreign labor.

States also need to work together more closely to share the benefits of migration, for example through partnering to identify significant skills gaps in one country that migrants from another are qualified to fill.   

Third and finally, we need greater international cooperation to protect vulnerable migrants, as well as refugees, and we must re-establish the integrity of the refugee protection regime in line with international law.  

The fate of the thousands who die in doomed efforts to cross seas and deserts is not just a human tragedy.  It also represents the most acute policy failure: unregulated, mass movements in desperate circumstances fuel a sense that borders are under threat and governments not in control.   

In turn this leads to draconian border controls which undermine our collective values and help perpetuate the tragedies we have too often seen unfold in recent years. 

We must fulfill our basic obligations to safeguard the lives and human rights of those migrants that the existing system has failed.

 We must take urgent action to assist those now trapped in transit camps, or at risk of slavery, or facing situations of acute violence, whether in North Africa or Central America.  We have to envisage ambitious international action to resettle those with nowhere to go.

 We should also take steps – through development aid, climate mitigation efforts and conflict prevention – to avoid such unregulated large movements of people in future.  Migration should not mean suffering. 

We must aim for a world in which we can celebrate migration’s contributions to prosperity, development and international unity.  It is in our collective power to achieve this goal.  This year’s global compact can be a milestone on the road to making migration truly work for all. 

The author is Secretary-General of the United Nations

I am issuing an alert — a red alert for our world – Antonio Guterres

Dear friends around the world, Happy New Year.

When I took office one year ago, I appealed for 2017 to be a year for peace.

Unfortunately – in fundamental ways, the world has gone in reverse.

On New Year’s Day 2018, I am not issuing an appeal. 

I am issuing an alert — a red alert for our world

Conflicts have deepened and new dangers have emerged.

Global anxieties about nuclear weapons are the highest since the Cold War.

Climate change is moving faster than we are.

Inequalities are growing.

We see horrific violations of human rights.

Nationalism and xenophobia are on the rise.

As we begin 2018, I call for unity.

I truly believe we can make our world more safe and secure.

We can settle conflicts, overcome hatred and defend shared values.

But we can only do that together.

I urge leaders everywhere to make this New Year’s resolution:

Narrow the gaps.  Bridge the divides. Rebuild trust by bringing people together around common goals.

Unity is the path.

Our future depends on it.

I wish you peace and health in 2018.  Thank you.  Shokran.  Xie Xie.  Merci.  Spasiba.  Gracias.  Obrigado.

Women’s rights are human rights – UNIC says as ‘Orange the world’ campaign lands in Zaria

It was an onset of the harmattan season on a dusty December morning in Zaria, Kaduna State, North-West Nigeria. The students, all girls, arrived in droves, eager to participate and host an educational briefing on the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence in their school, Government Girls Secondary School, Fada Zaria City. The educational briefing was organised by the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Lagos in collaboration with UN Women and Arewa Women And Youth Empowerment (AWAYE) Foundation.

Excited by the gift of thousands of orange scarfs and a few branded T-shirts to ‘Orange the world’, the students, numbering over 2,500, assembled and carved out a space for their drama presentation on ending violence against women and girls. They set the ball rolling quickly and set the stage on fire as they highlighted, through drama presentation, issues of domestic violence, sexual harassment in school, girl-child labour, and challenges of girls’ health, among others. In all these, the importance of the traditional institution was emphasised as the Emir’s scene was constantly on the front burner.

“Women’s rights are human rights. When a woman’s rights are violated, then her human rights have been infringed upon. Today we bring the message of ending violence against women & girls.” The National Information Officer of the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Lagos, Dr Oluseyi Soremekun, took the cue from the drama presentations. He emphasised that domestic violence was not a family affairs but a human rights issue.

He noted that the 16 days of activism against gender-based violence started on 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, and would end on 10 December, the Human Rights Day. Explaining the 2017 theme, ‘Leave No One Behind: End Violence Against Women and Girls’, Dr Soremekun said that it ‘reinforces the UNiTE Campaign’s commitment to a world free from violence for all women and girls around the world, while reaching the most underserved and marginalized, including refugees, migrants, minorities, indigenous peoples, and populations affected by conflict and natural disasters, amongst others, first.’

According to him, leaving no one behind, specifically women and girls that are threatened by or are suffering violence, or have been subjected to it in the past, requires resources, policies, commitments and programmes that focus on reaching the most marginalized communities. To end violence against women and bring change, the National Information Officer urged the students to raise their voices and speak out against any act of gender-based violence.

Speaking, Ms Iris Nxumalo, representing UN Women, highlighted the need for determination to speak out and bring change. She urged everyone, “Let’s Say ‘NO’ and UNiTE to End Violence Against Women and Girls during and after the 16 days of activism period.”

Addressing the students, the Principal of Government Girls Secondary School, Fada Zaria, Hajiya Safiya Abdul, thanked the UN team for the educational programme and informed the students that all women and girls deserve to live a life free from violence and fear. She implored them to report any act of gender-based violence directed at them.

In her remarks, the Founder of AWAYE, Hajiya Laila Muhammad urged the students to speak out against gender-based violence. The 16 days started on 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, and ends on 10 December, the Human Rights Day.

UNIC Lagos Launches World’s First Complete Braille Of Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)

The United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Lagos Nigeria, on Monday 11 December 2017 launched the first complete braille version of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) to mark the 2017 International Human Rights Day and the beginning of the year-long campaign to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the UDHR.

Launching the braille at the National Human Rights Commission headquarters in Abuja was the Resident Coordinator of the UN system in Nigeria, Mr Edward Kallon with the support of the Solicitor-General of the Federation, Dayo Akpata (Esq); the Canadian High Commissioner to Nigeria, Mr Christopher Thornley; and the Acting Executive Secretary of the National Human Rights Commission, Mrs Oti A. Ovrawah.

To the admiration of the audience, two students of Abuja School of the Blind, Miss Jacinta Odili and Mr Honesty Ayama read UDHR Articles One and Seven respectively from the braille.

Explaining the rationale behind the UNIC Lagos initiative to produce the Braille Version, Mr Kallon said, “In strengthening the efforts to leave no one behind and deepen universal access and usage of the UDHR, the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Lagos Nigeria, initiated and produced the Braille Version of the UDHR for the blind. We have heard of UDHR in sign language as well as in audio format. But, this Braille Version probably is the first of its kind in the world.”

According to him, this effort aligns with the directive of the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres that making global development inclusive of people with disabilities “must be an enhanced priority”. Delivering the message of the UN Secretary-General on the International Human Rights Day, the Resident Coordinator urged people and leaders everywhere to stand up for all human rights – civil, political, economic, social and cultural — and for the values that underpin our hopes for a fairer, safer and better world for all.

In her remarks, Mrs Ovrawah called on human rights defenders, activists, CSOs and NGOs to stand up for the rights of all, the IDPs, the refugees, the trafficked and those still in the captivity of Boko Haram and those in ‘slavery’ and held in bondage in Libya.

At the observance of the International Human Rights Day on the same day in Lagos, the Director of UNIC Lagos, Mr Ronald Kayanja made a public presentation of the Braille Version of the UDHR at the event jointly organised with the Zonal Office of the National Human Rights Commission, and held at Ikeja Local Government Council Secretariat.

“The Braille Version of the UDHR”, he explained, “therefore, aims to foster unity within diversity and enhance a sense of inclusiveness amongst the visually challenged, whose rights as human beings are enshrined in and protected by the UDHR.” He disclosed that in Nigeria, the UDHR has been translated into Edo, Efik, Ibibio, Hausa, Igbo, Kanuri Yerwa, Tiv, Yoruba and Pidgin English. “This gives credence to the need to leave no one behind.” He emphasised.

Mr Kayanja later led participants, who were mainly secondary students, to read and affirm the Human Rights Pledge to defend the rights of others as part of commemorating the 70 years of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). ‘When another’s human rights are denied, everyone’s rights are undermined. So I will stand up,’ they affirmed.

The UDHR is a milestone document in the global history of human rights, and is infused with values and ideals drawn from the world over. Drafted by UN representatives from diverse cultural and technical backgrounds, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations.

In 70 years of its existence, the UDHR has proven to be resilient and critical to the well-being of the human race. Its appeal is unprecedented, and it cuts across regions and races. In 1999, the Guinness Book of World Records declared the UDHR to be the most translated document in the world. Today, with 505 translations, it still is.

10 December 2018 will mark its 70th anniversary and UNIC Lagos is joining the UN Human Rights Office and the global community for a year-long celebration that kicked off on 10 December 2017.

Media urged to drive the narratives on the New Urban Agenda

Following Habitat III, the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development, which took place in Quito Ecuador 2016, and the emerging need to further build the capacity of the media in reporting Housing and sustainable urban development, the UN Information Centre (UNIC) Lagos and the UN-Habitat Nigeria have organised a Media Workshop on Post-Habitat III Conference/ New Urban Agenda. Speaking on the role of the media in the New Urban Agenda, the National Information Officer of UNIC, Oluseyi Soremekun, called on the media to drive the new narratives about urban development in Nigeria by getting acquainted with the New Urban Agenda (NUA) as well as relevant policies and plans of the government on housing and urban development. “If you are not conversant with the necessary NUA frameworks; the National Housing Policy as well as other National Plans, you cannot hold the government accountable to its commitment to a new urban agenda that will redress the way cities and human settlements are planned, financed, developed, governed and managed.” He noted. “Media should give prominence to the issues of sustainable housing, urban development and slum upgrading.” Soremekun said, “Media should rise above sensationalising and politicising issues of urban development. Rather, they should interrogate the existing housing and urban development policy and plan and juxtapose these with government actions.” The workshop held on Thursday 26 October 2017 in Abuja, and attended by twenty-five participants from the media, Federal Ministry of Power, Works and Housing (FMPWH) and the UN system, was aimed at strengthening awareness among journalists and media professionals of the challenges of urbanisation and the global efforts to address them, notably the outcomes of the Habitat III conference in Quito; developing the capacity of journalists to engage constructively with policy makers, professionals and government functionaries to actively follow-up on implementation of the New Urban Agenda; and facilitating citizens’ participation in the New Urban Agenda.  In his presentation, the Program Manager of UN-Habitat Nigeria, Mr Kabir Yari explained that the New Urban Agenda is an action-oriented document which sets global standards of achievement in sustainable urban development, rethinking the way we build, manage, and live in cities through cooperation with all levels of government, relevant stakeholders, and other urban actors such as the private sector. He noted that the agenda also “provides the underpinning for actions to address climate change and reaffirms our global commitment to sustainable urban development as a critical step for realizing sustainable development in an integrated and coordinated manner.” Mr Yari added that the shared vision and commitments include: “Cities and human settlements must be for every one; referred as the “right to the city”. It entails equal rights including the right to adequate housing; gender equality, basic urban services etc.; Urban equity and inclusiveness leaving no one behind and addressing issues of poverty, deprivation in cities, socio-economic and cultural diversity.” Discussing the “Challenges and Response to Urbanisation in Nigeria”, the Director of Urban & Regional Development (URD) Department, Federal Ministry of Power, Works and Housing (FMPWH), Mr L. C. Anikamadu, explained that “Nigeria boasts of more than ten regional centres which have established status of ‘millionaire cities’. In addition, she has several other fast growing population centres which have assumed very strong urban identity due to administrative, commercial, ethnic, transport connectivity and other intrinsic peculiarities.” Mr Anikamadu  who was represented by Mr Lana Olalekan, noted that as urbanization creates hordes of cities and townships, several intimidating challenges of different shades follow in its wake. “Perhaps most significantly, urbanization has created a huge class of ‘urban poor’ who live in unimaginable conditions, abject misery and lack of basic necessities of life.” He added.

UN Commends Nigeria on SDGs implementation, marks UN-Day with fanfare

The Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator of the UN system in Nigeria, Mr Edward Kallon, has commended the Government and people of Nigeria for the progress made in almost two years of the implementation of the SDGs.

He cited, “the establishment of a multi-layered and multi-cluster institutional frameworks for coordination of the SDG mainstreaming processes with the Office of the Senior Special Assistant to the President on SDGs (OSSAP-SDGs); a Private Sector Advisory Group, Donor Forum on SDGs and Civil Society Organization Advisory Group and a Presidential Council on the SDGS  inaugurated by the President; development of a good policy and planning framework for the Economic Recovery and Growth Plan and linked to the SDGs.”

Mr Kallon said this on Tuesday 24 October 2017, at the observance organised by the Office of the Special Assistant to the President on SDGs, Foreign Affairs Ministry and the UN at the Rotunda Hall of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Abuja. The event also featured SDGs exhibition featuring 17 stands representing the 17 Goals as well as children’s performance and unveiling of SDGs theme song and SDGs Ambassadors.

The Resident Coordinator however, urged Policy Makers and Partners in Nigeria to go beyond business as usual in implementing the SDGs with the required political will and integrated action for results. “One surest way of getting results is to incorporate the Agenda 2030 in national planning, policies, legislation and institutions at the Federal and State level.”

Delivering the message of the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on the 2017 UN Day, Mr kallon said, “The world’s problems transcend borders. We have to transcend our differences to transform our future. When we achieve human rights and human dignity for all people – they will build a peaceful, sustainable and just world. On United Nations Day, let us, ‘We the Peoples’, make this vision a reality.”

In her welcome address, the Senior Special Assistant to the President on SDGs, H.E. Princess Adejoke Orelope-Adefulire, disclosed that Nigeria has laid down an evidence-informed implementation pathway for the SDGs and has addressed the prevalent data deficit by conducting a mapping of existing statistics followed by the determination of 126 baseline SDGs indicators to benchmark progress, with technical backstopping from the UN Country Team. “It is now urgent to scale up of implementation to accelerate the attainment of most of the SDGs before the deadline of 2030.” She added.

In his keynote address, the Chief Executive Officer of the Nigeria Economic Summit Group, Mr Laoye Jaiyeola, observed that this year’s UN observance came at a critical time of global and national discourse of what must constitute our shared commitment to global and national cooperation that is targeted by achieving inclusive socio-economic development, shared prosperity and sustainable peace and security, in our time.

Dignitaries at the event included Senior Special Assistant to the President on SDGs, H.E. Princess Adejoke Orelope-Adefulire; Minister of Communications, Barrister Adebayo Shittu; Minister of Youth and Sports, Comrade Solomon Dalong, among others.